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Dermatitis, reaction to tinea
Dermatitis, reaction to tinea


Ringworm, tinea corporis on an infant's leg
Ringworm, tinea corporis on an infant's leg


Ringworm, tinea capitis - close-up
Ringworm, tinea capitis - close-up


Ringworm, tinea on the hand and leg
Ringworm, tinea on the hand and leg


Ringworm, tinea manuum on the finger
Ringworm, tinea manuum on the finger


Ringworm, tinea corporis on the leg
Ringworm, tinea corporis on the leg


Tinea (ringworm)
Tinea (ringworm)


Ringworm

Definition:

Ringworm is a skin infection due to a fungus or yeast. Often, there are several patches of ringworm on the skin at once. The medical name for ringworm is tinea.



Alternative Names:

Dermatophytid; Tinea



Causes:

Ringworm is common, especially among children. But, it can affect people of all ages. It is caused by a fungus or yeast, not a worm like the name suggests.

Many bacteria, fungi, and yeast live on your body. Some of these are useful, while others can cause infections. Ringworm occurs when a type of fungus or yeast grows and multiplies on your skin.

Ringworm can spread easily from one person to another. You can catch ringworm if you touch someone who has the infection, or if you come into contact with items contaminated by the fungus, such as combs, unwashed clothing, and shower or pool surfaces. You can also catch ringworm from pets that carry the fungus. Cats are common carriers.

The fungus that causes ringworm thrive in warm, moist areas. Ringworm is more likely when you are often wet (such as from sweating) and from minor injuries to your skin, scalp, or nails.

Ringworm can affect the skin on your:



References:

Habif TP. Superficial fungal infections. In: Habif TP, ed. Clinical Dermatology: A Color Guide to Diagnosis and Therapy. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2016:chap 13.

Hay RJ. Dermatophytosis (ringworm) and other superficial mycoses. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 268.




Review Date: 4/14/2015
Reviewed By: Kevin Berman, MD, PhD, Atlanta Center for Dermatologic Disease, Atlanta, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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