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Periorbital cellulitis

Definition

Periorbital cellulitis is an infection of the eyelid or skin around the eye.

Alternative Names

Preseptal cellulitis

Causes

Periorbital cellulitis commonly affects children under 18 months old.

This infection can occur after a scratch, injury, or bug bite around the eye, which allows germs to enter the wound. Or it can extend from a nearby site that is infected, such as the sinuses.

Symptoms

Symptoms include:

  • Redness around the eye or in the white part of the eye
  • Swelling of the eyelid, whites of eyes, and surrounding area

This condition does not usually affect vision or cause eye pain.

Exams and Tests

The health care provider will examine the eye and ask about symptoms.

Tests that may be ordered include:

Treatment

Antibiotics will be prescribed. They are usually taken by mouth. Or they may also be given as shots (injection).

Outlook (Prognosis)

Periorbital cellulitis almost always improves with treatment. In rare cases, the infection spreads into the eye socket, the tissues that surround the eye, and the eyeball itself. This infection is called orbital cellulitis.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your doctor right away if:

  • The eye becomes red or swollen
  • Symptoms get worse after treatment
  • Fever develops along with eye symptoms
  • It is difficult or painful to move the eye
  • The eye looks like it is sticking (bulging) out
  • There are vision changes

 

References

Wald ER. Periorbital and orbital infections. In: Long SS, ed. Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2012:chap 87.

Olitsky SE, Hug D, Plummer LS, Stass-Isern M. Orbital infections. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW III, et al., eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 19th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 626.


Review Date: 11/20/2013
Reviewed By: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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